Linearizing in Piezo pro


#1

Just so I understand the process here, when I go into the quad tone rip and select the Epson hot press curves, I still have to go through the linearization process for my 3800 printer to get everything working right? If so which curve do I do use? Or do I have to do all three? And if a paper is not on this drop-down list, such as Museo Max, then I have to wait for you to add it to the list? Some of this material is a wee bit confusing. The example you have on page 67 is for a carbon ink set.

I have some more questions but I think I will wait and see what your response is first


#2

If you have the Pro inkset, it will be perfectly linear out of the box.

The other P2 and K7 curves may need to be linearized at this point as they are several years old. If you are printing with Epson Hotpress paper and P2/K7 ink and you don’t see that curve listed, start with Hahnemuhle Photo Rag curve and linearize.

cheers!
Walker


#3

What about a paper like museo max which is not on the list. When you go to print the 51 step Target to begin the linearization process you’re directions show using a curve in Print tool. those curves are done. I am in section 9 on Linearizing piezography. I feel like I’m starting in the middle of the process. Pg 70. I guess the question is how do I create a curve for a new paper that needs to be linearized. And get it to show up in Print tool.


#4

By adding the new linearized curve to the curve folder and double clicking the Install(printer name-pro).command file you will see the new curve available in QuadtoneRIP curve menu.

 

Instructions for installing curves: http://piezography.com/install-delete-quadtonerip-curves/

 

best,

Walker


#5

Who do I talk to about to about making a phone appointment.


#6

It’s saturday, but feel free to call Monday 10am on.

We offer direct phone support here: http://shop.inkjetmall.com/Hand-holding-phone-support-1-call-15min-or-less.html

 

best,

Walker


#7

Where is the complete start to finish documentation on linearizing a paper for piezo pro. the manual provided starts in the middle of the process. also where is the documentation for creating soft proofing profiles. There is a lot written about why one should soft proof but I have found no documentation on how to to use the app provided with the Quad tone rip for creating softproofing profiles. If I had extensive prior experience with your other ink sets I might not be asking these questions. It seems to me you should have three simple lists of steps for the pro ink set. You do a reasonably good job of explaining the print workflow for a paper that you have already created the linearization files for. What you don’t do is explain the complete process for creating linearization files for a paper that is not in your system. You gave me information on how do install the curves but not create them And I can find no explanation on how to produce soft proofing ICC profiles.

On a separate note, I have been using Epson hot press paper and getting very good results using files that I had created for my Canon IPF6400. i just got some of your type 5 paper and I was surprised at how much mid tone exposure and shadow highlight adjustment I had to add to approximate what I was getting on the hot press paper. It would seem to me that if these papers with linearized properly I shouldn’t have to do that. Your thoughts.

 


#8

Where is the complete start to finish documentation on linearizing a paper for piezo pro. the manual provided starts in the middle of the process.

Section 9, Page 78 of the Piezography Deluxe manual is titled "Linearizing Piezography" and starts with an over-view and required software etc, and will take you through all the steps (screenshots included).

also where is the documentation for creating soft proofing profiles.

Making a soft-proof profile is almost exactly the same as making a linearization except you simply drag the measurement .txt file over "QTR-CreateICC-RGB" and not "QTR-Linearize-QUAD" droplet. There is a paragraph about this at the end of the "Linearizing Piezography" chapter. There is also slightly more detailed info about this at the end of PiezoDN chapter as PiezoDN actually uses these profiles for printing.

There is a TON of discussion and writing on how to do this on the Inkjetmall forum and QuadtoneRIP forum.

There is a lot written about why one should soft proof but I have found no documentation on how to to use the app provided with the Quad tone rip for creating softproofing profiles. If I had extensive prior experience with your other ink sets I might not be asking these questions. It seems to me you should have three simple lists of steps for the pro ink set. You do a reasonably good job of explaining the print workflow for a paper that you have already created the linearization files for.

What you don’t do is explain the complete process for creating linearization files for a paper that is not in your system.

That is what the "Linearizing Piezography" chapter is all about. When choosing one piezography curve to adapt to another type of paper, you simply choose one that is build for a per that is close to the paper you are trying to linearize. Piezography Matte profiles all came from 1 single curve so you can pretty much choose any curve to adapt to you paper. Piezography profiling is iterative now. You do not need a "master" curve like before.

You gave me information on how do install the curves but not create them.

The deluxe manual that you have access to here: http://piezography.com/downloads/piezography-professional-edition/ has the documentation as we clearly described in your Piezography Professional Edition welcome email.

And I can find no explanation on how to produce soft proofing ICC profiles.

I think you'll have a better understanding after reading the deluxe manual.

On a separate note, I have been using Epson hot press paper and getting very good results using files that I had created for my Canon IPF6400. i just got some of your type 5 paper and I was surprised at how much mid tone exposure and shadow highlight adjustment I had to add to approximate what I was getting on the hot press paper. It would seem to me that if these papers with linearized properly I shouldn’t have to do that. Your thoughts.

What inkset are you using? What .quad are you using? There are many variables. One variable is that Hotpress is a matte paper and Type 5 is a gloss paper. These two papers therefore have completely different contrast ranges. Normally an ICC profile will increase the contrast of the matte paper print while keeping the gloss paper print linear or even decreasing it somewhat. With piezography, everything is linear for all papers. This is what makes the magic shadow detail happen but will also show a difference between one paper (matte) and another (gloss) that is often covered up by other printing systems with a trade-of in shadow detail. This is well documented on this website/blog as well as in discussions, our workshops, etc. It's loosely called "The Linear Workflow." Making an ICC and printing with that for all the different papers (matte and gloss) will make the prints similar to each-other between the paper-types but at the expense of shadow detail and consistent "controllability' of the tonal values throughout the print.

-Walker


#9

Thank you this was quite helpful. I read chapter 9 again and if I understand this process correctly you have to do this process 3 times for each paper, once for cool,neutral and warm?

Actually i think this statement you wrote should be in Chapter 9.

“That is what the “Linearizing Piezography” chapter is all about. When choosing one piezography curve to adapt to another type of paper, you simply choose one that is build for a per that is close to the paper you are trying to linearize. Piezography Matte profiles all came from 1 single curve so you can pretty much choose any curve to adapt to you paper. Piezography profiling is iterative now. You do not need a “master” curve like before.”

This may have been stated and/or infered elsewhere but it’s kind of important. It’s all starting to make sense now. Thank you.


#10

I have one more question might have missed in my previous post. When I do a linearization for a new paper if I understand the process now I have to go through the procedure three times for cool, neutral, and warm?


#11

I suggest Linearizing before a large print project. This way you know that if you ever need to re-print a portfolio the same way, linearizing again will get you back to the same tonal values.

You really only need to lin Warm and Cool. The neutral you can make w/ the Blender Tool (faster).
best,
Walker